ADVOCATE: Young Murgon diabetes advocate Sydney Ziebell meets with Wide Bay member Llew O'Brien and MP Michael McCormack at Parliament House in 2018.
ADVOCATE: Young Murgon diabetes advocate Sydney Ziebell meets with Wide Bay member Llew O'Brien and MP Michael McCormack at Parliament House in 2018. Contributed

Access to device life-changing for kid with diabetes

MURGON'S Sydney Ziebell will walk the catwalk in Paris this year, a great feat for an eight-year-old boy with Type 1 Diabetes.

His mum, Jocelyn Malone, said funding from the Australian Government for constant glucose monitoring (CGM) devices was life-changing for her son.

"It has changed our lives. He's gone from five needles a day to having his pump changed once every three days, and I'm so much more at ease because there's an alarm that goes off if his levels change," Ms Malone said.

"Sydney is going to Paris to do Catwalk for Kids this year and that's something I wouldn't have ever even dreamed of, before he had the pump."

From March 1, free access to the devices is available for 37,000 people including pregnant women, children with conditions such as cystic fibrosis-related diabetes and neonatal diabetes, and more adults living with type 1 diabetes.

Sydney is an advocate for bringing greater awareness to type 1 diabetes which saw him travel to Parliament House in 2018.

When Member for Wide Bay Llew O'Brien met young Sydney he promised to remember support funding for research to find a cure for juvenile diabetes.

Mr O'Brien is proud funding from the Australian Government will assist children like Sydney achieve their goals.

"This means that youngsters like Sydney will be able to live life to the fullest, without having to constantly manage their condition with injections," Mr O'Brien said.

This investment builds on the Australian Government's recent announcement of $54.5 million for research into type 1 diabetes.

"As part of that announcement, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Australia will receive $25 million to advance its Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network so that maybe one day there will be a cure for kids like Sydney," Mr O'Brien said.

A further $25 million will also be dedicated to broader diabetes research under the $125 million MRFF Targeted Translation Research Accelerator initiative, to help progress early stage health and medical research discoveries to reach proof-of-concept and progress to clinical trials.

"It's only as a result of the Liberal National Government's ability to deliver a stronger economy can we make these critical investments into CGM and type 1 diabetes research," he said.