Daryll Jones, pictured with judge Patrick Burns, won the painting award at the 385 Alive competition.
Daryll Jones, pictured with judge Patrick Burns, won the painting award at the 385 Alive competition. Contributed

Anti-mine art protest wraps up

THE 385 Alive art protest against the proposed Kingaroy Coal Mine wrapped up with a special showcase on Sunday.

Kingaroy Concerned Citizens Group spokesman John Dalton said the competition received about 250 entries.

"Daryll Jones from Kingaroy won the main painting prize of $500,” Mr Dalton said.

"In the painting the landscape was clearly of 385-type land. What he did to it was so clever and somewhat unconventional.

"In the foreground there was a traditional country gate, but done really small into it were 'no Kingaroy coal mine' signs.

"With the stick he composed that was in the shape of a crucifix, with little drips of blood coming down it, to symbolise crucifixion of the land somewhat.”

Anneloes Warrener won the main photography prize.

"Everyone who came to the showcase said the project did the job,” Mr Dalton said. "It used art forms to get the message out about a complex issue.

"The young students ... really entered into the spirit of it. The adult work was all that plus a high degree of skill.

"It really highlighted not just the mine issue but the sheer love of the arts and talent in the district, which is amazing.

"The community does not want this mine.

"They might want employment and economic growth, but not at any cost,” he said.

"The art project showed the cost and people are now saying the cost is too high.

"It showed the arts is not just alive and well in the South Burnett, but is a really powerful medium for people to express what they think about important issues.”

Mr Dalton said there was some irony to hosting the showcase on the same day as the rail trail opening.

"The company is planning to turn the rail trail into a coal train line,” he said.

"It would take it from a fantastic thing for the community to the worst possible thing.

"While we were celebrating the land, with a company proposing to turn it into the most awful thing. That certainly wasn't lost on people yesterday.”