Kingaroy Baconfest aimed to show their support and to bring awareness of the many issues regional Queenslanders face by bringing crowds to the regional town.
Kingaroy Baconfest aimed to show their support and to bring awareness of the many issues regional Queenslanders face by bringing crowds to the regional town. Jessica McGrath

Baconfest joins 'agvocates' support to change major issues

THE Kingaroy Baconfest team are one of many agvocates to show their support to regional Queenslanders.

The food festival team said on a Facebook post they shared the same goal as Agforce's latest 'Stand Up for Queensland Ag' campaign.

"When you come to Baconfest remember why the event is on, show your support for regional Queensland,” they said.

The festival came about because the region was struggling with the drought, local pig industry was struggling and the economy needed a boost.

"Bacon seemed like the perfect way to celebrate our local industries and to attract visitors to our region,” they said.

Baconfest and the Agforce campaign both aim to show their support and to bring awareness of the many issues regional Queenslanders face.

These issues include a lack of infrastructure, or access to businesses, community services and digital connectivity.

Agforce general president Georgie Somerset compared some of the conditions regional Queenslanders face to third-world countries.

Australian farmers are among the least subsidised farmers in the world, receiving just 2 per cent of their income through government agricultural support.

Prices in the Australian National Electricity Market have soared with record-breaking electricity prices.

Electricity costs have risen more than 130 per cent in Queensland, putting pressure on the bottom line for farmers.

According to Agforce, roads maintenance spending is low and Australia faces a major maintenance deficit for road infrastructure.

Small businesses are struggling in regional Queensland with families to travel further for essentials as shops serving essential products and services close.

Farmers are also left behind in the digital revolution.

Queensland as a lower score than the national average for digital inclusion and digital connection is significantly more expensive in rural Queensland.

Agforce said there is a lack of community services in regional areas, with many people struggling due to the pressures of regional life.

Mental ill-health and psychological distresses are 28.9 per cent more common among farmers than other members of the community.