Bullying has forced a Mackay teen to switch schools
Bullying has forced a Mackay teen to switch schools

Schoolgirl pinned against wall and screamed at by bullies

A MACKAY schoolgirl has been pinned against a wall and screamed at, had her laptop broken twice and dirt put in her drink bottle - and the bullying has now meant the teen has uprooted her life.

Her worried mum Jamey says the bullying has become so bad she has moved her daughter to Mackay North State High School at the start of this term for her own safety.

The 15-year-old, who the Daily Mercury has chosen not to name, claims to have been harassed by the same group of girls since she began Year 7 at her previous school.

"They'd bully her in the toilets, on the stairs, trip her stupid... petty stuff that they don't realise can hurt kids," Jamey said.

"They pinned [her] against a wall and was swearing at her face as she was standing there.

"And I showed up at the school and they were all laughing at me through the fence.

"You can punch someone until they're black and blue in the face, you forget about that, but it's the name calling that sticks in your head forever."

The teen was even told by her bullies she wouldn't be safe if spotted at Caneland Shopping Centre.

"She's had to move her whole life because of these kids," Jamey said.

"It just made her very intimidated, and her confidence just went... she had nothing left."

Jamey's biggest fear is that the bullying could escalate into further violence, or worse.

The Daily Mercury revealed last month that Mackay Police attend at least two violent incidents at schools every month, including cases where students are thrown against walls or found with a knife in their possession.

In one 2017 incident, classed assault occasioning bodily harm, a girl was attacked by two offenders who punched and slapped her, before one of them "pulled the victim by her hair and pushed her repeatedly into a wall".

Mackay Child Protection Investigation Unit officer-in-charge Detective Senior Sergeant Emma Novosel said there were six reported assaults in April and May, including a teacher being assaulted when he tried to intervene, a student alleging they had been assaulted by a teacher, two other bodily harms and one where a child had his collarbone broken by another student.

"I wouldn't say there's an alarming increase, it's just something that happens when you put people all in one place, like anywhere across the community," she said.

"We become involved when an official report of an assault is made, when there is an incident in a school, that child and their parent can make a decision whether they want to proceed formally and we'll investigate and deal with it."

Jamey, who was herself bullied in school, said it's time schools began showing students "the real world", instead of talks by 'experts' with pamphlets that just end up in the bin.

"It's horrible world out there... these kids need to see reality, bring ex-prisoners in to speak with these kids, or parents who have lost their children to suicide," she said.

"Bullying stuffs up your life it really does, because you think people are going to be against you, or if you make friends, whether you can trust them.

"How much resilience can you build?"