BAIL REVOKED: An Eidsvold man has faced Gayndah Magistrates Curt on one charge of obstructing police and one charge of failing to provide a specimen. Picture: File
BAIL REVOKED: An Eidsvold man has faced Gayndah Magistrates Curt on one charge of obstructing police and one charge of failing to provide a specimen. Picture: File

'God sent me here' says accused during argument with magistrate

AN EIDSVOLD man has faced court and told the Magistrate to charge him with "whatever [they] like", just before his bail was revoked mid-session.

Billy-Joe Carter, 38, faced Gayndah Magistrates Court on one charge of obstructing police and one charge of failing to provide specimen of saliva for analysis.

Carter represented himself, and told the magistrate his suspended licence had impacted on his ability to work at his logging business.

He went on to say that if he did not get his licence back that day, he would be forced to drive himself, and would inevitably be arrested for disqualified driving.

Magistrate Ross Woodford then clarified the two charges, indicating the charge of failing to provide a specimen carried a mandatory disqualification.

"I can't convict you, fine you and not disqualify you," Mr Woodford said.

Carter protested the punishment, saying he wouldn't be able to eat, live, or house himself, which meant they'd "have to lock (him) up".

A debate then ensued between Magistrate Woodford and Carter on the specifics of the charges, with Carter saying he "didn't do anything wrong".

Police prosecutor Sergeant Kathryn Stagoll then read the facts to the court, saying the defendant was "belligerent" while they were trying to administer a second specimen analysis.

"He's then gone to walk out, and he was arrested," Sgt Stagoll said.

Mr Woodford then told Carter this was the reason for the obstruction charge, and subsequently pleaded guilty to it.

Further clarification was then needed on the second charge of failing to provide a specimen, as Carter indicated he did provide one, and would be pleading not guilty.

"If you go to trial, it's a minimum two years on your licence, and two years' imprisonment."

"Go for it, I'll only last a week then I'll die again, I warned youse [sic] a year ago."

"You don't warn me, you don't warn me or warn this court. You don't stand there with that silly grin on your face, you carried on last time like this," Mr Woodford said.

"You were so, so, so, so close to being charged with contempt of court."

"Charge me with whatever you like," Carter replied.

Mr Woodford said he would be turning the case over to Maryborough Court for trial, and asked if the defendant understood, to which he replied "yes".

"God sent me here, a year ago, and he gave me a life after what youse done, and now youse are doing it again," Carter said.

"I've had enough of you pointing your finger at me and carrying on like a little child," Mr Woodford warned.

"You settle down, anything else from you and I'll charge you with contempt of this court, you understand that?"

"As I said I don't have a life now, because of youse [sic], and your system," Carter replied.

Mr Woodford then revoked Carter's bail and instructed him to sit in the dock until called.

Carter retook the stand several minutes later, where he told the court he'd just like to deal with the matters.

He then pleaded guilty to both charges, confessing he gave his specimen on the first test, and was guilty of not giving a second test.

Carter went on to confess that he uses cannabis as a painkiller, and that he doesn't take anything pharmaceutical.

"I don't even take Panadol."

Mr Woodford said the minimum loss of licence for that charge would be three to six months, but took into account that his licence had been suspended for the last two months.

On failing to provide a specimen he was convicted, fined $500, and disqualified for driving for one month.

On the obstruction charge, he was convicted and fined $200.