Some people take it upon themselves to try and repair their own cars.
Some people take it upon themselves to try and repair their own cars. MANN JOE

COLUMN: DIY work under the bonnet can cost you more

I'VE been in the automotive industry for more than three and a half decades and, while I'm a little greyer than when I started, it's safe to say the one thing that hasn't changed is how often I see or hear of a car repair job gone wrong.

The most alarming I've seen were those repairs conducted by people who'd had little to no training whatsoever in the automotive field.

Often, some of these people take it upon themselves to try and repair their own cars, which usually ends with less than favourable results.

It generally plays out like this: soon after the home-tinkering under the hood begins, the situation starts to unravel. Often these amateur mechanics either don't realise or won't accept they're out of their depth and are making the problems worse.

Eventually they realise (albeit too late) that their ambition exceeded their ability, resulting in the car having to be towed to a repairer to try and unscramble the egg. It usually means there is a much higher repair cost than if they'd gone to a professional in the first place.

As well as a potential hit to the hip pocket, there's a serious warning - amateur mechanic work can be downright dangerous, and sadly, some people have lost their lives attempting to fix their cars.

You don't need 30 plus years in the automotive industry to recognise when it's best to call a professional. If you don't know what you are doing, let a mechanic do the work, because it could cost you much more than money if you get it wrong.