Dysart boxer Ciara Storch (red) has dominated opponents in the ring since she began boxing four years ago.
Dysart boxer Ciara Storch (red) has dominated opponents in the ring since she began boxing four years ago.

Dysart boxing prodigy on the road to Olympics

CRAIG Storch exhausted all earthly superlatives when discussing the meteoric rise to Australian boxing stardom of his daughter, Ciara.

So he went higher.

"What she's done is over the moon," the proud Dysart dad said.

To say the 13 year old is one of the best young boxing proponents in the country would be underselling her prodigious talent.

She is the best - her record speaks for itself.

The Dysart State High School student is a three-time Golden Gloves winner, three-time Queensland Title holder and, as of last year, owner of an Australian Junior Title.

In four years and 19 fights, Ciara has lost just once - her first, on a split-points decision.

She fought the same opponent three months later and got her revenge. There has been nothing but wins and grins since.

There are no rivals beating Ciara to the punch once she gets going in the ring.

Her dominance has made it easier for Craig to keep his role as coach and father separate.

"That's the thing, I don't ever see her struggle," he said.

"So as a dad, I don't get nervous or worried."

Such is Ciara's love for the sport, which she took up four years ago, Craig has to hold her back from overtraining.

"Sometimes you have to say 'have a break'. We tried to give her a few weeks off over Christmas, but she wanted to keep going … we had to say 'no, you're not allowed in the gym'," Craig said.

Ciara Storch (left) with Australian boxer and Commonwealth Games gold medallist Skye Nicolson.
Ciara Storch (left) with Australian boxer and Commonwealth Games gold medallist Skye Nicolson.

"That was the biggest learning curve of my coaching career, realising it's not all about training every day.

"When we're at training, it's training; when we leave, it's family time."

Ciara prefers to do her talking in the ring, where it matters.

But the softly-spoken southpaw made sure her goals were well-known.

"I want to represent Australia at the Commonwealth Games and Olympics," she said.

"(This year) my goal is to be a two-time Australian champion and maybe travel overseas a bit more."

The path to the top of Australian boxing is

"Boxing for women, girls, teenagers, it's starting to lift," Craig said.

"It's unbelievable what is available for girls now.

"Her pathway, what she's aiming for, is to get to Youth Worlds then as she gets older, the Commonwealth Games, then Olympics and then, turn pro."

But the scariest prospect for Australian boxing rivals not fighting out of Dysart Boxing Club, is that Ciara may not be its last champion.

"Her little sister is going to be really good, too," Craig said of 10-year-old Millie.

"She's had one fight and beat a 13 year old on split points. "She'll be an eye-catcher as well."