JUGGLING MONEY: Marcie and Paul Halse said their business had been going backwards for while.
JUGGLING MONEY: Marcie and Paul Halse said their business had been going backwards for while.

Failed Murgon businessman blames ‘cliquey groups’

UP UNTIL recently, Paul Halse was a business owner in Murgon.

With his wife, Marcie, they operated the Murgon tyre shop, Burnett Tyre Service on Lamb St since 2015.

Sadly, they made the tough decisions this month to close the doors on advice from their solicitor.

OUTGOINGS: Paul Halse with wife, Marcie said they hadn't drawn a wage from their Murgon business for the past 12 months.
OUTGOINGS: Paul Halse with wife, Marcie said they hadn't drawn a wage from their Murgon business for the past 12 months.

Paul, 49 said they had been going backwards for quite sometime.

"We were losing too much money," he said.

"I rang my solicitor and he said if you're not selling tyres and not making money, close the doors."

The drought was obviously an issue, and Paul understood farmers needed to watch their pennies.

"It hasn't rained here for 12 months, people aren't spending money,"

"A farmer will run a tyre until it is buggered."

But, the former business owner said there were several contributing factors that lead to his decision to shut up shop.

"The footpath outside the shop that was supposed to take two weeks, took six," he said.

"And it is still not finished."

"That cost me $30,000.

"That's what broke the camel's back."

CLOSED DOWN: Paul Halse from Murgon business, Burnett Tyre Service encouraged others to do their research before starting a business in South Burnett.
CLOSED DOWN: Paul Halse from Murgon business, Burnett Tyre Service encouraged others to do their research before starting a business in South Burnett.

Paul also alleges there are specific groups in the area that only supported one another.

"There are certain cliquey groups," he said.

"People say buy local, but it is only little pockets of busy areas."

If he was able to have his time over again, Paul said he would not have gone into business.

"I would have kept my $100,000 in the bank and found something else," he said.

The business had been on the market since last September, but unfortunately, they could not find a buyer.

"It was initially on the market for $260,000 plus stock, in the end it was down to $80,000,' Paul said.

"We couldn't give it away."

But moving forward, he is able to see the positive, and Paul has all ready secured new employment.

"It could always be worse," he said.

"I was lucky enough to be offered a job at Clovelly Estate (winery)."

Paul offered some advice to anyone thinking of setting up a business in the South Burnett.

"Do your research," he said.

"Look into it 100 per cent.

"Look at the strengths and weaknesses in the area."

Paul and Marcie wished to thank all their customers who supported them over the years.