CAPTURED IN TIME: Niles Elvery with a letter sent by W.H. Thompson to his daughter in Wondai in 1918 from France.
CAPTURED IN TIME: Niles Elvery with a letter sent by W.H. Thompson to his daughter in Wondai in 1918 from France. Katherine Morris

Fragments of war on show in Cherbourg

CHERBOURG residents have had the opportunity to get their hands on pieces of wartime history - and maybe even add to them.

Niles Elvery, State Library of Queensland regional co-ordinator for the Anzac 100 project, hosted a white glove experience with artefacts from the First World War at the Cherbourg Ration Shed Museum.

Mr Elvery said the white glove experience had come to Cherbourg so the State Library could find stories or artefacts to add to the collection, as it had nothing about indigenous soldiers and their contribution to the war.

"We don't really have anything that relates to the Aboriginal contribution to the war in the State Library,” he said.

"We've come to Cherbourg so we can learn about the contributions and recover information and share material we have.”

The State Library has had a collection of First World War artefacts since the 1930s, including photographs, letters, diaries and other artefacts from soldiers, nurses and other war personnel.

"We do have a letter from W.H. Thompson from 1918 that he sent to his daughter Irene from France,” Mr Elvery said.

"It seems like he was using a letter as a distraction from the war as he doesn't mention what's going on.”

The resources included a 1915 Red Cross magazine, a photo album of rural Queensland recruitment rallies, Second Light Horse association records and the Gallipoli diary of Reverend George Green.