High up in the Boat Mountain Reserve (PHOTO: Laura Kate)
High up in the Boat Mountain Reserve (PHOTO: Laura Kate)

FULL GUIDE: Region’s best bushwalks and hiking trails

IF YOU'RE chasing a challenging bushwalk with breathtaking views, or the perfect spot for a picnic with the family, the South Burnett region has you covered.

Here is a guide to some of the region's must-see natural attractions.

Mt Kiangarow

High in the Bunya Mountains National Park is one of the area's most photogenic locations. Mt Kiangarow is renowned for its breathtaking panoramic views and incredible sunsets. The 2.3km trail climbs gradually, winding around the mountain and leading to an avenue of grass trees at the crest. Be sure to take a torch if you go for sunset.

The view from high up in the Bunya Mountains Photo: Tristan Evert
The view from high up in the Bunya Mountains Photo: Tristan Evert


Bunya Mountains Scenic Circuit

The Scenic Circuit is the Bunya Mountains' most visited trail, and for a good reason. The 4km trail starts from the Dandabah picnic area and passes through ancient bunya pine forest and mountain scenery. The well-maintained trail is suited to all ability levels and passes through the beautiful Festoon and Tim Shea falls. Just around the corner is Pine Gorge lookout, offering a panoramic view of the South Burnett region.

The Scenic Circuit is popular for hikers of all ages Photo: Tristan Evert
The Scenic Circuit is popular for hikers of all ages Photo: Tristan Evert

Rail trails

Previously home to two rail trails, the South Burnett region is now part of a 305km-long stretch that encompasses sections from Wulkraka all the way to Kingaroy. Since the opening of the Yarraman to Kingaroy trail in August this year, trail enthusiasts can now embark on single-day treks right through to epic multi-day adventures.

The Brisbane Valley Trail takes in sections from Ipswich to Moore in the Ipswich region, and from Moore to Yarraman in the South Burnett. The trail traverses farmland, forests, picturesque rural settings and country towns.

The Kilkivan to Kingaroy Trail totals 89km, however is broken down into eight sections. The Kilkivan to Kingaroy Rail Trail includes Queensland's longest sealed rail trail of 44km from Kingaroy to Murgon.

These trails offer something for everyone and allow cycling, walking and in some sections horse riding.

Embark on an early morning ride on the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail. Photo: Contributed
Embark on an early morning ride on the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail. Photo: Contributed


Mt Wooroolin

A quick 10-minute drive from the centre of Kingaroy will get you to one of the area's best vantage points. Found at the top of Mt Wooroolin is a lookout, picnic tables and barbecues. The area offers several walking trails, with some steep sections.

The View from Mt Wooroolin, Kingaroy Photo: Tristan Evert
The View from Mt Wooroolin, Kingaroy Photo: Tristan Evert


Boat Mountain Reserve

Just 12km northeast of Murgon is the Boat Mountain Reserve. This distinctive flat-topped ridge, shaped like an upturned boat, is covered in dry rainforest and open eucalypt woodland. At 589m above sea level, Boat Mountain is a landmark in the Murgon area, and the headwaters of four creeks. The trail is a 2.6km return trip that will take you out to Daniels Lookout.

High up in the Boat Mountain Reserve Photo: Laura Kate
High up in the Boat Mountain Reserve Photo: Laura Kate


Coomba Falls

Just outside Maidenwell is one of the region's most popular watering holes, Coomba Falls. Coomba Falls is known for its steep descents and deep water, creating the perfect setting for the avid thrillseeker. Coomba Falls can be enjoyed by everyone and is the perfect place to cool down on a hot summer's day.

Coomba Falls, Maidenwell Photo: Petra Harris
Coomba Falls, Maidenwell Photo: Petra Harris


D'Aguilar National Park

If you're prepared to hit the road you will be rewarded by remote gorges, sheltered pockets of subtropical rainforest, expanses of eucalypt woodland and spectacular views to Moreton Bay. The D'Aguilar National Park is a good two-hour drive from Kingaroy, covering approximately 36,000ha, protecting the core of the D'Aguilar Range's vast bushland area. The park has a series of trails throughout the park that cover all ability levels.

A lace monitor in D'Aguilar National Park
A lace monitor in D'Aguilar National Park


Palms National Park

More than 90 species of birds, flying foxes, frogs, red-necked pademelons and swamp wallabies can all be found along the Palms National Park Palms Circuit. This 650m gentle trail runs along a spring-fed creek bed and is home to several plant species that date back to the dinosaurs. This is a great trail for the family with picnic tables throughout, just 8km northeast of Cooyar.

Palms National Park Photo: Contributed
Palms National Park Photo: Contributed


Wooroolin Wetland

The Wooroolin Wetland offers a relaxing spot for a walk or a picnic. If you look closely you might see birds lurking in the shallows. Along the walking track there are nesting boxes that are inhabited by sugar gliders and possums.

The Wooroolin Wetlands PHOTO: Takira Walters
The Wooroolin Wetlands PHOTO: Takira Walters


Ros Gregor Walking Track

Being the fourth-oldest town in Queensland, Nanango is also the first town that was established in the South Burnett region. The Ros Gregor Walking Trail starts at Tipperary Flat, continues along Sandy Creek and joins up with the walking track past the cemetery and back to Lions Park. The 5.8km track is used for the Nanango parkrun which is a free weekly event for runners of all standards, taking place every Saturday at 7am.

One of the locals along the Ros Gregor Trail PHOTO: Tristan Evert
One of the locals along the Ros Gregor Trail PHOTO: Tristan Evert


Gordonbrook Dam

Gordonbrook Dam is Kingaroy's sole water source and was built in 1941. The dam is non-recreational and therefore doesn't allow boating, fishing or swimming, however is the perfect spot for a picnic, walk or bird watching. There are a variety of trails around the dam and a viewing platform that looks over the entire area.

Gordonbrook Dam from a distance (Photo: Tristan Evert)
Gordonbrook Dam from a distance (Photo: Tristan Evert)