ACES & EIGHTS: Social motorcycle club president Harley Cash chats with Matt Collins.
ACES & EIGHTS: Social motorcycle club president Harley Cash chats with Matt Collins. Hayley Marie

'Homeless at 12': Motorcycle club president opens up

HARLEY Cash is the president of social motorcycle club, Aces & Eights. He shares a behind-the-scenes look at what goes on in a motorcycle club and gives his honest thoughts on the strict motorcycle club laws that were introduced in recent years. But maybe the most interesting part of Harley's story is his childhood - after being homeless at 12, he owned his own house by 19.

Listen to the full interview with social motorcycle club president Harley Cash here:

 

Matt Collins:

When did you first get on a motorbike?

 

Harley Cash:

I was one when I first got on a bike. My father owned Harley-Davidsons shops but I was about four I think when I rode my own bike.

 

MC:

Did you know early on this was something you wanted to do?

 

HC:

From as far back as I can remember.

 

MC:

What was the appeal?

 

HC:

I'm not really sure, I just love everything about it.

 

MC:

Let's talk about the motorcycle club, Aces & Eights. There is a stigma about motorcycle groups. Have you experienced this?

 

HC:

We have in some ways, but we are upholding the law and we are not doing anything wrong, so in that sense we don't get picked on.

 

MC:

The State Government cracked down hard on motorcycle clubs a couple of years ago. Is there justification for the police and the general public to question the motives of a motorcycle club - the 1% clubs but also social clubs?

 

HC:

In some sense, yes there is because of the history of what has gone on. But it has gone too far, like I know people who can't see their own mother because their brother has a criminal conviction. Now there is legislation for minors which states children can't hang out with other children whose parents have a conviction.

 

MC:

You do some great things in the community, but has there been incidents in your life where it's been justified that the police come down on you?

 

HC:

Maybe when I was a juvenile and I didn't know any better. I was out of home by the time I was 12 so I sort of just had to do my own thing and put myself through school. But by the time I was 19 I had bought my first house so you could say I had a little camel hump there where I didn't really know who I was.

 

MC:

So you left home at 12, was your mum around?

 

HC:

I haven't really spent that much time with my mum.