MOVING AHEAD: South Burnett Agriculture Network spokeswoman and BIEDO chief executive officer Kristy Frahm.
MOVING AHEAD: South Burnett Agriculture Network spokeswoman and BIEDO chief executive officer Kristy Frahm. Tobi Loftus

Info will help when disaster crops up

THE first trial has finished on a project to collect data on what is grown in the South Burnett and its value, the aim being to provide useful information after times of disaster.

South Burnett Agriculture Network, along with Burnett Inland Economic Development Organisation and the University of Southern Queensland, is spearheading the project.

Network spokeswoman and BIEDO chief executive officer Kristy Frahm said the project was still in the research stage.

"We have the test site that has been ground-truthed from the map,” she said.

"It's about finding the best process for gathering the information, how to put that into a framework that has a data set that people can use.

"And what's the way forward with updating it on a six-monthly basis with summer and winter crops so we know it's accurate in a way that's not too time consuming or costly?

"That's the process we're working through.”

Mrs Frahm said the first test was done recently and went well.

"The ground-truthing part of it was done at the test site around the Mondure-Byee floodplain area,” she said.

"The next step is to take the information from that map and put it into a data set we can utilise.”

Ms Frahm said the data set and map were primarily to help during times of disaster, such as flood and fire, so authorities, landholders and insurers could know what was grown where and the worth of it.

But she said the data could have many other uses.

"It's a great tool for measuring what is produced from our region,” she said.

"It can be used as comparative evidence as well for what we are producing over the years, showing this is what we produced two years ago and then this is what we are producing two years in the future.

"It's going to be fantastic to have that ability to compare it.”

Ms Frahm said there was no time frame on expanding the project past this first trial stage.

"We don't want it to take forever, but we don't want to settle on something that's not the best process in the long run.”