EXCITING: Fraser Coast businessman Greg McGarvie (second from right) with the very first ACE Cargo Van, which was unveiled at the Sydney International Convention Centre in April.
EXCITING: Fraser Coast businessman Greg McGarvie (second from right) with the very first ACE Cargo Van, which was unveiled at the Sydney International Convention Centre in April. Contributed

Landmark deal to assemble electric vehicles in Australia

A LANDMARK deal that will change the future of Australia's electric vehicle industry started right here on the Fraser Coast.

Just months after the launch of his company's first electric vehicle, the ACE Cargo Van, ACE-EV managing directory Greg McGarvie announced a partnership between the business and Adelaide truck body maker Aldom.

The Maryborough businessman said the agreement was set to bring ACE-EV's range of vehicles roaring into life.

Under the deal with Aldom Motor Body Builders, which has more than 40 years of experience in building vehicle bodies for the commercial transport industry, assembly of ACE-EV's Cargo commercial electric vehicles will start from the first quarter of 2020.

Mr McGarvie said the deal with Aldom brought extensive vehicle body manufacturing experience and related capabilities, as well as existing factory floorspace - the final piece of the puzzle for the Australian start-up.

"What Aldom is doing is pretty well supporting everything we need in terms of builder and assembler, as well as distribution and warranty and servicing," Mr McGarvie said.

The man behind the $216 million Teebar Solar Farm had hoped to manufacture the vehicles on the Fraser Coast.

However due to the support the project received from the South Australian Government, Mr McGarvie decided to take operations there.

The first Cargo Van was assembled in a warehouse at Logan, south of Brisbane, and glued together to make the Cargo Van.

Mr McGarvie kept costs down by designing a carbon fibre shell made of flat-pack parts sourced from China and Taiwan.

Aldom CEO Mark Haig, speaking to The Driven, said between 15 to 20 staff would be hired to create the new assembly line.

"Work-wise for us it will be very good, it will be a whole new team," he said.