HARSH PENALTIES: Protesters glued to a zebra crossing in Brisbane's CBD yesterday.
HARSH PENALTIES: Protesters glued to a zebra crossing in Brisbane's CBD yesterday. Liam Kidston

'Like a tonne of bricks' LNP propose tough new trespass laws

STATE government is being pressured to support tough new trespassing legislation, including lengthy prison sentences, proposed the by the LNP opposition following increases anti-Adani rhetoric and demonstrations.

Opposition leader Deb Frecklington said people who partake in activities such as strapping themselves to coal trains "should have the book thrown at them".

"Environmental extremists make calculated decisions to strike at these mines knowing full well the consequence is little more than a slap on the wrist under Labor," she said.

"You can guarantee these activists will raid time and time again until there are sufficient laws in place to deter them."

Three laws proposed by the LNP include Aggravated trespassing carryng a maximum of three years imprisonment or a maximum fine $13,055.

 

Queensland Opposition Leader, Deb Frecklington.
Queensland Opposition Leader, Deb Frecklington.

Serious Criminal Trespass would carry a maximum penalty of 10 years imprisonment or a maximum fine of $391,650.

Perhaps the most severe is the charge of organised trespassing carrying a maximum fine of 10 years imprisonment or a $391,650 fine.

Ms Frecklington said the measures were just and would offset costs such activities pose.

"The behaviour causes significant economic harm, it terrorises workers or train drivers just doing their job, and it drains police resources," she said.

"Everyone has a right to protest, but sabotaging industrial operations has no place in society and no one is above the law."

She urged those in government to consider the measured put forward and believed the tough laws would protect workers.

"(These laws) will come down like a tonne of bricks on these extremists and send the message that if you sabotage Queensland mines or ports, you face jail time," she said. The measures were first raised by in early may after a spate of organised farm invasions.