END OF THE PRINT ERA: Long time South Burnett Time's readers Bill Hull, Lottie Ballin, Ollie Schaffer and Lurline Dousi from the Orana Retirement Living and Aged Care in Kingaroy say they have been reading the local paper for as long as they can remember.
END OF THE PRINT ERA: Long time South Burnett Time's readers Bill Hull, Lottie Ballin, Ollie Schaffer and Lurline Dousi from the Orana Retirement Living and Aged Care in Kingaroy say they have been reading the local paper for as long as they can remember.

Long time readers look back

WITH this Friday’s newspaper edition comes the end of an era and the beginning of a new decade of news, and for some of the South Burnett Time’s most dedicated readers, the heyday of print didn’t feel that long ago.

Ollie Schaffer was born in Bangalow in 1926 before moving to Kingaroy with her family as a mere bub, at just 10 months of age.

She says she’s been reading the South Burnett Times since it was still known as the Kingaroy Herald.

Long time South Burnett Times reader Ollie Schaffer says the paper has been a major part of her life for as long as she can remember.
Long time South Burnett Times reader Ollie Schaffer says the paper has been a major part of her life for as long as she can remember.

“I can remember going to school with some of the Blue children, their family used to own the paper back in the day and I can remember is always came out on Tuesday and Fridays.”

Lurline Dousi said she has always turned to the births, weddings and funerals section before reading every single page from top to bottom.

“I check the funeral notices first thing the minute I get my hands on the paper, then I read everything else. I always have ever since I can remember, the local newspaper has always been apart of my life,” she said.

South Burnett Times reader Lurline Dousi.
South Burnett Times reader Lurline Dousi.

Lottie Ballin said the paper has served as her lifeline to all the goings on in the community for several decades.

“It’s been good to still know what is happening at all the local school and clubs around the region, it’s nice to be in the know and reading the paper twice a week is the only way a lot of older residents find out about local news.”

Bill Hull (no relation to the Kingaroy car dealer) said he’s greatly enjoyed keeping up with all the South Burnett sport through reading the paper every Tuesday and Friday.

Long time South Burnett Times reader Lottie Ballin.
Long time South Burnett Times reader Lottie Ballin.

“I particularly enjoy reading about the local tennis cricket and football. I always turn straight to the back as soon as I get my hands on a paper.”

Mrs Schaffer said one of the events that will always stick with her was the peanuts silo fires in 1951 when she was just 25 years old.

“I can still remember seeing the big glow in the sky.

“My father worked as a storeman at the peanut silos and he wasn’t able to work for some time afterwards.

“He was able to just look at a big load of peanuts and know how many bags you could get out of it.

Bill Hull says the South Burnett Times sport pages have brought him a great deal of enjoyment over the years.
Bill Hull says the South Burnett Times sport pages have brought him a great deal of enjoyment over the years.

“It’s events like the fires and floods where it’s so important to have a local newspaper record and document what happens, otherwise how do you remember when you get to my age?”

While the last 99 years have brought about a lot of change regarding the way news is produced and consumed, you can still rely on South Burnett Times to keep you up to date on all the big local news stories from fires, floods and everything in between via our online website.