A man faced Kingaroy Court on a possession charge committed in 1990, proving that even minor drug offences do not fade with time. File Photo.
A man faced Kingaroy Court on a possession charge committed in 1990, proving that even minor drug offences do not fade with time. File Photo.

Man faces 30-year-old drug charge before Kingaroy Court

A MAN is living proof that even after three decades drug charges do not expire, instead waiting patiently for Peter Joseph Shepherd to return to the sunshine state since 1990.

On September 16, 1990, a then 19-year-old Shepherd was intercepted by now-retired police officers while driving in Kingaroy, who subsequently located cannabis seeds in his vehicle.

Police prosecutor sergeant Pepe Gangemi said police located Sheppard driving a Datsun motor vehicle, where they subsequently found 123 cannabis seeds and charged him with possession.

Shepherd was also charged with failing to appear in court the next day and was not picked up again by police until October 2020.

The defendant‘s lawyer, Jay Rose of Rosegold Legal, said her client has been working in the Northern Territory for the past 30 years and returned to Queensland recently to pursue medical treatment for his 8-year-old daughter.

“His daughter suffers from a degenerative bone condition, and they wanted closer access to medical treatment in Queensland,” she said.

Ms Rose said Shepherd has no criminal history and simply failed to return to Queensland to deal with the minor charge in a timely matter.

“That tells you how old it is. That it’s a Datsun,” Magistrate Andrew Sinclair said.

For the possession charge, Shepherd was convicted and not further punished.

For the fail to appear, he was fined $500 to reflect the period of time that he had been at large.

No conviction was recorded.