GHOSTBUSTERS REMAKE: Leslie Jones, Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig and Kate McKinnon in a scene from the movie Ghostbusters.
GHOSTBUSTERS REMAKE: Leslie Jones, Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig and Kate McKinnon in a scene from the movie Ghostbusters. Hopper Stone

FILM REVIEW: Ghostbusters

AS I left the cinema on Sunday night, I felt proud.

I had just watched the 2016 remake of the cult classic Ghostbusters, a film which, I admit, I have yet to see.

Since it was first announced last year that a female cast would replace the original male-heavy act, significant controversy has ensued.

Given we live in a world where female representation in film is grossly insufficient, I jumped at the chance to support a production that had the ability to jettison the archaic ideologies of how women are supposed to look, act and be.

The film was directed by Paul Feig and follows four women who start a ghost-catching business in New York City. Although Feig is known to create cinematic mastery with the likes of Melissa McCarthy and Kristen Wiig, the film, unfortunately, didn't blow my mind.

While it would be great to report the film lived up to predecessors such as Bridesmaids and Spy, Ghostbusters didn't maintain the same high notes or have the ability to induce tear-filled cries of laughter.

Reuniting Feig with McCarthy and Wiig, the film does provide several snorts and a couple of belly laughs. But given the stellar talent involved, one might have hoped for a little more. At face value, the film is enjoyable, and aside from the constant fart humour, watching McCarthy and Wiig, with SNL's Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones was momentous in itself.

Amid the forced humour, several jokes hit the mark and having Chris Hemsworth there for eye candy added extra points.

People will always compare it to the original and complain that women shouldn't play roles such as these, but films like these, that break the barriers, need to be out there. Don't see it for its cinematic genius, see it for equality.

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