Supplied  Channel 7's Sunday Night explosive new interview with Dan Shearin and
 Robinson family
Supplied Channel 7's Sunday Night explosive new interview with Dan Shearin and Robinson family

Murder accused allowed to remove tracker

THE Gold Coast cruise ship entertainer accused of throwing his cheerleader girlfriend from a high rise balcony has won a bid to have his GPS tracker removed.

Jayden Moorea, formerly known as Dan Shearin, was in 2019 charged with murder of his 21-year-old girlfriend Breeanna Robinson and later granted bail.

The Titans cheerleader plunged to her death from the 11th floor of a Southport apartment in 2013.

Moorea is also accused of stalking nine other women between 1999 and 2004.

Jayden Moorea was last year charged with the murder of Breeanna Robinson.
Jayden Moorea was last year charged with the murder of Breeanna Robinson.

He on Tuesday applied to the Brisbane Supreme Court to vary his bail conditions, which include reporting to police daily, not accessing social media and wearing a GPS tracking bracelet on his ankle.

Moorea was granted bail in February last year on "the most stringent conditions" including being required to notify police before he enters into a sexual relationship.

The court today allowed a change to these conditions to allow the ankle bracelet to be removed.

Breanna Robinson. File picture
Breanna Robinson. File picture

Justice Peter Callaghan made the decision after hearing Moorea had complied with his bail conditions for more than a year, only breaching his reporting condition once for reasons that could be explained - namely taking his dog to the vet.

Crown prosecutor Sam Bain did not oppose the application to vary the bail, saying COVID-19 meant Moorea was unlikely to be doing any travel nationally or internationally, which had originally been a risk because of his links to cruise ships.

In making the order, Justice Callaghan said COVID-19 could not reduce the risk of flight but that an ankle tracker contributed to stopping a person from failing to appear in court.

He also said potential offending such as stalking via text message would not be ameliorated by keeping a GPS tracker in place.

"The applicant has complied almost entirely with the other conditions of the bail," Justice Callaghan noted.

"He has reported six days per week to police … with no noncompliance, save for one occasion that can be explained."

Ms Robinson's aunt Janine Mackney said today's decision to allow the GPS tracking device to be removed was a "kick in the guts" for the family.

"It's a kick in the guts all the time and you just get used to that because the legal system just doesn't support us.

Moorea's defence solicitor Chris Hannay told The Courier-Mail his client was "looking forward to having his day in court".

Originally published as Murder accused allowed to remove tracker