An aerial view of Noosa Main Beach and the current Noosa Surf Life Saving Club. Photo: Lachie Millard.
An aerial view of Noosa Main Beach and the current Noosa Surf Life Saving Club. Photo: Lachie Millard.

Noosa surf club building up for sale for $15,000

A PIECE of Queensland's surf life saving history has hit the market with a bargain basement price in one of the most expensive real estate markets in the state.

The Noosa Surf Club of the 1930s is a far less grand affair than the one that now boasts a prime position on fashionable Hastings Street, but the original was built to stand the test of time and comes with loads of charm.

The former Noosa Surf Club building from the 1930s is for sale for $15,000. Picture: Facebook.
The former Noosa Surf Club building from the 1930s is for sale for $15,000. Picture: Facebook.

The simple structure that stood on stumps in the sand dunes nearly 90 years ago has ended up on Facebook Marketplace, where it is being advertised for sale for the price of a small car - just $15,000.

It's a measly amount compared to surrounding properties in the area.

The rafters inside the former Noosa Surf Club building. Picture: Facebook.
The rafters inside the former Noosa Surf Club building. Picture: Facebook.

The 5.3m x 7.3m x 4.2m shack, with rafters purpose-built for surfboard storage still intact, can be picked up from Doonan, where the median house price is $870,000, according to property researcher CoreLogic.

The view from the current Noosa Heads Surf Life Saving Club on Hastings St, Noosa.
The view from the current Noosa Heads Surf Life Saving Club on Hastings St, Noosa.

The advertisement describes the property as a "charming old Queensland surf shack seeking new custodian" and continues by saying it "would make (a) marvellous cottage, studio, guest room, et cetera".

Inside the former Noosa Surf Club building from the 1930s. Picture: Facebook.
Inside the former Noosa Surf Club building from the 1930s. Picture: Facebook.

Seller Damon Bereziat declined to comment.

The building was reportedly used as the 'Tip Top Tip Shop' at the Noosa Refuge Station prior to finding its way online.

Despite its age, the timber floorboards, rafters and roof are in good condition.

The timber floorboards of the former Noosa Surf Club building from the 1930s are still in good condition. Picture: Facebook.
The timber floorboards of the former Noosa Surf Club building from the 1930s are still in good condition. Picture: Facebook.

Originally published as Noosa surf shack a beach bargain