Clint and Tina Kenyon at their market stall at BaconFest 2019's South Burnett Flavours.
Clint and Tina Kenyon at their market stall at BaconFest 2019's South Burnett Flavours. Hidden Gold Homestead Facebook

'Only way we can move forward without losing everything'

YOU might have seen him manning the microphone at the South Burnett Flavours market at BaconFest 2019.

Farmer Clint Kenyon was at the celebration of pork to promote the high quality of producers and growers in the South Burnett.

Twelve years ago Mr Kenyon, his wife Tina and their young family started to shift their approach to farming by using regenerative agricultural methods to ensure longevity on their land.

After focusing on their own methods, the South Burnett farmer believes there is always more farmers can do in to make their farming practices more sustainable.

Some the little piggies at Hidden Gold Homestead.
Some the little piggies at Hidden Gold Homestead. Hidden Gold Homestead Facebook

"There is certainly some great stuff happening around the South Burnett,” Mr Kenyon said.

"Some people are further along than us, but we are still making a headway on our property.

"One of the main reasons we started using regenerative agriculture was to help build resilience in times of drought.

"If we can make our properties sustainable we are going to better off, especially in times when there is little rain and water supply.”

Mr Kenyon said being able to build soil nutrition and diversify their stock had been a big boost.

"We use a range of animal species and plants which allows us to have higher-quality land,” he said.

Cattle grazing off the land on dusk at Hidden Gold Homestead.
Cattle grazing on dusk at Hidden Gold Homestead. Hidden Gold Homestead Facebook

While the couple loves learning about regenerative agriculture, Mr Kenyon said he didn't knock those who weren't following in similar footsteps.

"I don't like to criticise chemical agriculture,” Mr Kenyon said.

"Everyone is on their own journey.

"It's an evolution type of thing and they have to be open to the idea.

"I know it's hard enough to feed cattle and be viable, however I think people need to consider the long-term benefits.

"For myself it's the only way we can move forward without losing everything.”

The local homestead offers breakfast, lunch and dinner.
The local homestead offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Hidden Gold Homestead Facebook

Since starting their journey towards more sustainable farming, Mr Kenyon said he was surprised by the change in uptake.

"We first started out by introducing regenerative ag at our butcher shop,” he said.

"People would look at us with two heads if we mentioned the topic.

"Now it's become a lot more mainstream and you are seeing a lot more producers using them.”

Mr Kenyon is also passionate about educating consumers.

"People tend to look outside of their own backyard,” he said.

"We have so many well-established growers and producers here. Now our job is about making them aware of the nutritionally, dense products on offer.”

The Kenyons now own and operate Hidden Gold Homestead in Moffatdale.