South Burnett Times journalist Laura Blackmore. Photo: Elaelah Harley
South Burnett Times journalist Laura Blackmore. Photo: Elaelah Harley

OPINION: How to spark joy in global health crisis

I KNOW I’m not alone when I say the current health pandemic has impacted my life.

It’s hard to escape the consistently evolving updates from all levels of government.

You can’t miss all of the precautionary signage at the shops, or the dotted markers for where you are supposed to stand in line to abide by social distancing measures.

I get it – it can all feel quite overwhelming at times.

For the past couple of months my team and I have been working from home.

My gym was forced to close, parkrun was cancelled indefinitely and the AFL season was postponed, eliminating a few of my weekly social outlets.

When these changes were unfolding, my boss highly recommended that we have a good routine in place in order to maintain both a healthy physical and mental state.

As an extrovert, I thrive on our daily office banter and heading then to the gym to catch up with my mates and keep up an active lifestyle.

I severely underestimated the importance of a routine because the longer these restriction have been in place, the less motivated I have become.

For me, working and ­exercising at home was not ideal.

However, with the hope of the AFL season potentially being reignited in the coming months, my coach suggested last week that we all download an app called Strava to track our fitness.

Being part of this online community has boosted my morale and I have even set some new challenges.

For example, I ran from McDonald’s in Kingaroy to the top of Mount Wooroolin on Sunday for the first time.

I might of underestimated the intensity of the final hill, but it has given me a fresh perspective.

Finally, I am feeling ­excited for life post pandemic.

Running back down Mount Wooroolin felt amazing after reaching the submit. Photo: Dan Waira
Running back down Mount Wooroolin felt amazing after reaching the submit. Photo: Dan Waira