'I like to turn pain into really good things': Gold Logie winning actor, Samuel Johnson.
'I like to turn pain into really good things': Gold Logie winning actor, Samuel Johnson. Contributed

PODCAST: Gold Logie winner rolls with the punches

SAMUEL Johnson is one of Australia's most popular and most loving actors, which is even more impressive when you find out the amount of hardship he has endured in his life.

From the tragic suicide of several close people in his life, to the well publicised breast cancer journey his sister Connie faced, the Dancing with the Stars champion has been through more than most.

But none of it seems to faze him. He is currently on a two-year national tour raising funds and awareness for the Love Your Sister charity.

LISTEN: Get the full interview with Samuel Johnson here.

Matt Collins:

If I was talking to one of your good mates growing up and I asked them, if the Samuel Johnson we see on our screens is the one off the screen the same person, what would they say?

 

Samuel Johnson:

They would say yeah, he has been playing within two degrees of himself his whole career. I'm pretty much a heart-on-my-sleeve, am-what-I-am kind of guy. I can't really hide my moods very well. I'm pretty transparent. I'm one of those people, I don't have the brains or the strength to disguise my feelings.

 

MC:

Not being able to hide your emotions, does that get you into trouble?

 

SJ:

Uh, no, the more I am open with them, the better the places it leads me. Now that I am going with it, it's providing great riches. But when I fought against it as a younger man it chewed me up somewhat.

 

MC:

In what way? Are we talking high school days?

 

SJ:

Probably up until I started growing up about six or seven years ago. You've got to have a place for all your feelings. You can't keep them all bottled up inside because we are not big enough to hold them all in. I'm a better-out-than-in type of guy.

 

MC:

Haha, you're an outside dog, you're not an inside dog.

 

SJ:

Yeah, bloody oath. The more you try to contain something, it seems like a fool's errand.

 

MC:

You said, six or seven years ago you started to grow up, you've had a lot of less than ideal things happen to you and your family over the last few years. Can you pin point that down to one thing?

 

SJ:

Yeah, it would've been the moment my sister was diagnosed with terminal cancer as a young mum of two boys aged two and three. That served as my wake-up call. What I've learnt is you can't help whatever happens, but what you can do is control how you respond to it. Everything can be turned around. I like to turn pain into really good things.

 

MC:

You always seem so humble, to the point where you come across very nervous. You seemed very nervous when you were with the Prime Minister or when you did the painting with Anh Do. It's very humbling, its great to see, but is that a fair thing to say?

 

SJ:

More like chronic anxiety and absolute fear. I am scared of public speaking. No different to anyone else, you've just got to walk through the fear. It's a constant battle. Because it's not about my nerves, it's about beating bloody cancer.

 

MC:

You played Molly Meldrum, probably better than Molly himself. How do you get rid of those nerves for playing someone like Molly? Are you able to just go into that character.

 

SJ:

After a while you can, but for the first couple of weeks while you are finding your feet you are really scared before every take. Whether it is dancing on Dancing with the Stars, playing Molly Meldrum, trying to ride a unicycle around Australia for a year, this is all stuff that encourages maximum nerves. I'm anxious now.

 

MC:

The first interaction with Molly, how did that go?

 

SJ:

It was years ago. My dad was a drinking mate of his. I first met him when I was 21. He helped me out. He saved me from a law suit, I was getting sued by Russell Crowe and he sorted it out for me. It was a bizarre start to a 20-year association.

LISTEN: Get the full interview with Samuel Johnson here.