One Nation Party leader Senator Pauline Hanson sits down for a rare and intimate interview, where we find out about the woman behind the political policies.
One Nation Party leader Senator Pauline Hanson sits down for a rare and intimate interview, where we find out about the woman behind the political policies. Leighton Smith

PODCAST: The lighter side of Pauline Hanson

LEADER of the One Nation party, Pauline Hanson, was a late starter in politics.

She didn't stand for local government until she was 40.

But as we all know, she didn't take long to make her mark.

Regardless of your thoughts on her poltical views, there is no denying she is a compelling figure in Australian politics.

In this rare and intimate interview, we find out about the woman behind the political policies.

Pauline talks about her proudest moments and her biggest regrets, as well as recalling what helped get her through her time in prison.

Enjoy this rare and intimate chat with one of the country's most captivating characters.

LISTEN: Get the full interview with One Nation Leader, Pauline Hanson here:

Matt Collins:

Were there ever any aspirations for politics back at school?

 

Pauline Hanson:

No, none. None whatsoever. I remember I'd talk about politics when I was around about 25. I would talk about Joh Bjelke-Petersen and get into arguments with the neighbours in the street.

 

MC:

Have you seen any of your teachers after school? Have they reached out to you since?

 

PH:

Funnily enough, the principal at high school, Mr Butcher, ended up being a member of a club where I did some part-time work back in the 1980s. I worked there behind the bar and I was teaching him how to pour a beer and work behind the bar.

 

MC:

All those skills you had learnt at school obviously.

 

PH:

Yeah.

 

MC:

You stood in for local government when you were 40. What was the inspiration for that?

 

PH:

That was on a principle, because the council threw the mayor out. I thought, you can't do that. That was undemocratic, the people voted the mayor in. So that encouraged me to stand and I won. I saw corruption and there was no accountability. But I got a lot of satisfaction out of doing what I could for the people.

 

MC:

Getting into politics at 40, do you think that was an advantage for you?

 

PH:

What we don't need is more career politicians. We need people there for the right reasons. I think at that time in life I was ready for it. I had had my children and I had experienced life as a single parent, the struggle, trying to make ends meet and a running a business.

 

MC:

What memories do you have of when you started your political journey?

 

PH:

I was very fresh and very naive. When I went to my first meeting as a candidate and the shadow minister said, 'sit down, shut up, you know nothing, we know everything'. I was pushed by an agenda that you can't question the system.

 

MC:

Let's talk about One Nation. When you started your party, were you confident of it being a success?

 

PH:

Yes, I did, I remember I had a meeting at Inverell and we had over 1000 people turn up at the hall. At Newcastle, the centre there was packed out with over 1500 people. At Perth, it was amazing, we had a couple of thousand people there. So wherever I went, the halls were packed out. People were interested in what I had to say. People were thinking what I was thinking but didn't have the guts to say it.

 

MC:

Being a female in politics and being a female in politics for a long time, what advice would you have for a young aspiring politician?

 

PH:

Look, some people say to me I am an inspiration for other women. That's wonderful if you do feel that way. But I had a young 10-year-old boy who came up to me at a polling gbooth. I said to him, 'you poor darling, your mum dragged you out here' and he said, 'no, I dragged my mum out here.' He's the future of this nation.

 

MC:

Sign him up now.

 

PH:

Well, like I say to all these young ones, don't just follow me because you might see me on TV or hear me on the radio. Understand who you are voting for, look at their policies. It's all about your future and the future of the country.

 

MC:

What's the best advice you have ever received and who did it come from?

 

PH:

Well, everyone has given me advice, but whether it is good advice is another thing.

 

MC:

What about the best advice you give to people?

 

PH:

Put yourself up on a pedestal. Don't let anybody drag you down. You know within yourself what sort of person you are. No one is better than you are.

 

MC:

What does Pauline Hanson do to relax?

 

PH:

Oh, a few things. I like to cook, I bake and I knit and I do gardening and I swim when it is warmer.

 

MC:

You're a knitter?

 

PH:

Yes, I do. I knit all my own jumpers. I've been knitting since I was 13.

 

MC:

As easy way to tick off your Christmas list.

 

PH:

Well, I don't know. Sometimes I think people think these knitted jumpers are for old grannies.

 

MC:

Pauline Hanson, I would happily wear a knitted jumper from you can I say.

 

PH:

Thank you, Matt.

LISTEN: Get the full interview with One Nation Leader, Pauline Hanson here.