Victim Dwayne Robert Davies. Picture: Ink Addiction
Victim Dwayne Robert Davies. Picture: Ink Addiction

Murder-accused wife had a 'clear desire for him to be dead'

A warm serving of coconut milk may have been the fatal tipping point for a tattoo artist later found buried in a shallow bush grave.

Dwayne "Doc" Davies, 47, died instantly when he was shot in the head at close range before his body was wrapped in a tarpaulin and stashed beneath logs and soil at Levendale in May 2017.

His wife, Margaret Anne Otto, and friend Bradley Scott Purkiss, have denied murdering the "cantankerous, difficult and needy" Risdon Vale man.

But in her closing address to a jury on Wednesday, Crown prosecutor Madeleine Wilson said the pair were liars and the evidence against them was "vast".

Her comments came following a four-week Supreme Court of Tasmania murder trial examining 48 witnesses.

Ms Wilson said on the morning of his death, Mr Davies complained to his "trapped" wife that the coconut milk she'd prepared for him was warm.

Feeling alone and unable to escape, Otto "wasn't coping" and felt like the situation was killing her, Ms Wilson added.

"Mr Davies was not the kind of person to go willingly. Unless he was dead, there would be no peace," she said.

Otto, 47, appeared visibly distressed on Wednesday as details of the alleged murder were summarised, while the bearded Purkiss, 43, gazed dispassionately ahead.

Ms Wilson said Otto was fed up with her husband, a financial burden, who had led the couple almost to the point of declaring bankruptcy.

Otto instigated Purkiss, also financially encumbered by Mr Davies to the tune of $17,500, to lure her husband to an Elderslie cannabis "grow house" where he fatally shot him, it is alleged.

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"She wanted him to make Mr Davies go away for good," Ms Wilson said.

"She expressed a clear desire for him to be dead.

"It was clear to them the situation had come to a head and that a permanent solution was required."

The 12-gauge shotgun used in Mr Davies' death has never been found.

However, prosecutors told the jury say the "self-righteous" Purkiss was attempting to source shotguns in the lead-up to Mr Davies death, and may have taken one from his father's property.

The trial continues, with the jury expected to enter into deliberations next week.