Kingaroy Snake Catcher, Darryl Robinson with Eastern brown snake.
Kingaroy Snake Catcher, Darryl Robinson with Eastern brown snake. Contributed

SNAKE MAP: Venomous snakes have catchers on toes

IN THE past two weeks, Kingaroy Snake Catcher, Darryl Robinson has caught five of the country's most venomous snakes - but he says he is only going to get busier.

We are about to embark on another snake season, and Mr Robinson said the lack of water will only mean more sightings of our slithery friends in the coming months.

"With the drought, all animals are basically moving around looking for water and food.," he said.

Mr Robinson caught and released close to 400 snakes last season and he was expecting a similar number this year.

 

Kingaroy Snake Catcher, Darryl Robinson with Eastern Brown snake.
Kingaroy Snake Catcher, Darryl Robinson with Eastern Brown snake. Contributed

In our snake map below, the Kingaroy snake catcher has unveiled the location of the five captures of venomous snakes in the South Burnett region in the past two weeks.

But he was preparing to catch a lot more than that in the coming months.

"In busy periods I could get that in a day," he said.

"At the busiest, we were getting eight call-outs a day."

Mr Robinson said snakes are currently out and about looking for a partner.

"They have their babies around January, and by April or May it will all be done and dusted," he said.

 

Eastern brown snake.
Eastern brown snake. Contributed

He encouraged all residents to take care around snakes and to remember they are more afraid of us then we are of them.

"They are defensive, not aggressive," he said.

"They are scared.

He said the best advice if you see a snake is to stay completely still.

"They have very poor eye sight, so remain dead still," he said.

"When you think they are a safe distance away, back off slowly."