Roslyn Rees from Workplace Health and Safety Queensland made the trek to Kingaroy to visit Eliza Crawford and her mother Kelly Crawford and present Eliza with her prizes.
Roslyn Rees from Workplace Health and Safety Queensland made the trek to Kingaroy to visit Eliza Crawford and her mother Kelly Crawford and present Eliza with her prizes. Madeline Grace

South Burnett student's artwork chosen for calendar

KINGAROY State School student Eliza Crawford has won a prize for her drawing about quad bike safety which features in a 2020 Workplace Health and Safety calendar.

Roslyn Rees, senior compliance support officer in Workplace Health and Safety Queensland's Agricultural Unit, made the trek to Kingaroy to present Eliza with her prize and a copy of the calendar her artwork is in.

"Workplace Health and Safety Queensland have been running a farm safety competition for the past four years now,” Ms Rees said.

"It's to raise awareness to primary school-aged children about farm safety, about what the hazards are, what the risks are, and how to be safe on farms.

"We give them about four main messages which gives their teachers something to have a conversation about with the kids and then they send in some drawings related to those topics.”

Kingaroy State School Year 1 student Eliza Crawford has had her Farm Safety artwork featured in a Work Place Health and Safety 2020 calendar.
Kingaroy State School Year 1 student Eliza Crawford had her Farm Safety artwork featured in a Workplace Health and Safety 2020 calendar. Madeline Grace

This year, Eliza took out the September spot in the calendar, after more than 1700 entries were submitted in Queensland.

"I'm one of the judges and judging them is really tricky,” Ms Rees said.

"Eliza did her picture on quad bike safety, which is currently a big issue on farms.

"She has won $250 and the school has received $500 as a part of the prize.”

Ms Rees said the judging criteria weighed up the importance of the safety issue highlighted in the drawings, with the creativity displayed.

"This was a very important issue,” she said.

"Quad bikes are still the leading cause of injuries on farms and of fatalities on farms.

"Agriculture employs only 3 per cent of the Queensland workforce but it's responsible for 30 per cent of the fatalities.

"Promoting healthy and safe farms is something that I'm really passionate about and this farm safety calendar is just one way of promoting the issue and teaching children about such an important issue.”

Prize winner Eliza Crawford with her mum Kelly Crawford.
Prize winner Eliza Crawford with her mum Kelly Crawford. Madeline Grace

Eliza's mother Kelly Crawford said she was proud of her daughter's win.

"We don't live on a farm but she always rides the quad bike on her grandmother's farm,” she said.

"We're very big on safety with it.

"It's important to be safe considering how dangerous the bikes can be.”

The Australian Government has planned to introduce a new safety standard for quad bikes.

There have been 128 fatalities since 2011 due to quad bike accidents, about 60 per cent of those caused by rollovers.

Within 12 months, all new quad bikes will be required to have a warning label alerting riders to the risk of a rollover, meet US or European standards, test for stability, and also display the result on a hang tag attached to the quad bike when being sold.

Within two years, all new general-use model (utility) quad bikes will be required to be fitted with, or have integrated into the design, an operator protection device (rollbar) and meet minimum stability requirements.

Member for Flynn, Ken O'Dowd, said the safety of the public was at the forefront.

"There has been a lot of deaths related to quad bikes over the past few years and this includes children,” Mr O'Dowd said.

"These changes are designed to help minimise this.”