Roslyn Gregor in one of the building's she is trying to save from demolition.
Roslyn Gregor in one of the building's she is trying to save from demolition. Katherine Morris

Historian in the fight to save our buildings from demolition

ROSLYN Gregor is fighting to save the 100-year-old former seamstress building and the old community health building at the Nanango Hospital from crumbling into a "pile of timber and rubble".

The Nanango Historical Society president said a wealth of memories and history was at stake if a directive by Queensland Health to demolish the buildings went ahead this month.

"It's heartbreaking such a significant piece of our local history might be lost forever," she said.

Plans to demolish the two long-standing buildings at the Nanango Hospital were announced as part of a project to create more parking at the hospital and provide better access for patients at ground-level entry.

Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service general manager rural Michael Bishop said the demolition, due to go ahead within the month, was planned to better meet disability access standards.

While Mrs Gregor understood the reasoning, she said the buildings were in "absolute perfect order" and there was no need to demolish them.

"It's absolutely devastating to think they will be bulldozed," she said.

HISTORICAL HOME: Nanango Historical Society president Roslyn Gregor stands in front of Ringsfield House. Photo Kate Benedict / South Burnett Times
HISTORICAL HOME: Nanango Historical Society president Roslyn Gregor stands in front of Ringsfield House. Photo Kate Benedict / South Burnett Times Kate Benedict

The historical society president said Nanango was the fourth oldest town in Queensland and it was "time we recognised and preserved these places".

Mrs Gregor said community groups like the Nanango Show Society needed an office building and the two hospital buildings would be perfect.

Mr Bishop said the Darling Downs Hospital And Health Service "agreed to investigate the request" to save the buildings from demolition.

"The health service has agreed to investigate the request to relocate the small building, known as the seamstress building," he said.

"Negotiations are continuing about what will happen with the old community health building."

Member for Nanango Deb Frecklington said she went "directly to the health board for discussions" when she was told of plans to demolish the buildings.

She said she appreciated the hospital needed to make changes, but the buildings were in "quite good repair and would be moveable".

"Especially if the buildings would help community groups who have a purpose for them," she said.

"What I want to see happen is for common sense to prevail."