Fire dangers at the 2009 crash-landing of a civilian plane at the Oakey Army Aviation Centre were minimised using large amounts of fire-fighting foam. Formerly-used toxic chemicals were discontinued in 2005, but several other crash-landing incidents and training exercises are thought to have contributed to the contamination of bores in Oakey.
Fire dangers at the 2009 crash-landing of a civilian plane at the Oakey Army Aviation Centre were minimised using large amounts of fire-fighting foam. Formerly-used toxic chemicals were discontinued in 2005, but several other crash-landing incidents and training exercises are thought to have contributed to the contamination of bores in Oakey. Kevin Farmer

Oakey's poison foam coated runway

VAST amounts of poisonous fire-fighting foam were used for decades on the runway of the Oakey Army Aviation Centre.

The 2009 crash-landing of a civilian plane on the airstrip (pictured) occurred after the toxic substances were taken out of commission. However, images of the landing give an idea of how fire-fighting foam has been used at the site.

"The 2009 incident involved a civilian aircraft and was responded to by the Toowoomba emergency services," a Department of Defence spokesman said. "No Defence fire fighting products were used."

The 1990 crash-landing of a Nomad aircraft was dealt with in much the same fashion, using the now-abandoned foams.

"Other incidents are also known to have occurred throughout the operations of Army Aviation Centre Oakey," the spokesman said.