FAREWELL: Doctor John Robinson is retiring after 48 years of service. Photo: contributed
FAREWELL: Doctor John Robinson is retiring after 48 years of service. Photo: contributed

Well loved doctor’s farewell after 48 years of service

DOCTOR John Robinson doesn’t think he’s anything special but his patients would beg to differ.

After 48.5 years caring for the people of Nanango, the popular Dr Robbie is retiring at the age of 73.

Over that time he has delivered countless babies, sat by numerous bedsides and saved many grateful lives.

He’s also brightened people’s days with his sense of humour and become a cherished member of the community.

FAREWELL: Doctor John Robinson is retiring after 48 years of service. Photo: contributed
FAREWELL: Doctor John Robinson is retiring after 48 years of service. Photo: contributed

“I’ve actually had a wonderful life here and it’s been an honour and privilege to look after the community and I really mean that,” he said.

“They were my patients and they became my friends.”

Dr Robbie moved from Brisbane to take up the GP role at Nanango Hospital in 1972 and never left.

“I was the hospital doctor until about two years ago. I’ve seen a heck of a lot in that time as you can imagine,” he said.

“I was the first face a lot of people saw; I’ve even delivered someone who is now a grandmother.

“I have too many memories to mention.”

Colleagues and patients have described Dr Robbie as the best doctor in the South Burnett, sharing stories of his bedside vigils, supporting people through tough times and his compassion.

But the humble doctor shies away from the praise.

“Everyone is going to say that about their doctor, I am under no illusions,” he said.

“In my day that was what you did as a doctor, it was your job, it wasn’t anything noble, you didn’t think about it.

“It was what was required.”

FAREWELL: Doctor John Robinson is retiring after 48 years of service. Photo: contributed
FAREWELL: Doctor John Robinson is retiring after 48 years of service. Photo: contributed

After nearly five decades in Nanango, Dr Robbie said he was unsure what he would do to fill his days in retirement but he was still healthy enough to explore many options.

“We’ll see. I may still do the odd day a week in medicine,” he said.

More than anything he said he would miss the daily interaction with local people.

“And from what I am hearing it goes the other way as well; people say they will miss me and I will miss them.”

Articles contributed today by Kat Donaghey were supported by the Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas.