GETTING LOW: Gordonbrook Dam supplies 30 per cent of the water for Kingaroy.
GETTING LOW: Gordonbrook Dam supplies 30 per cent of the water for Kingaroy. Jessica McGrath

When you can expect Burnett water restrictions to increase

WATER restrictions in the South Burnett will remain at level three for the foreseeable future.

This is according to South Burnett Regional Council's general manager for infrastructure, Aaron Meehan.

During the August council meeting, Mr Meehan said the restrictions would remain at level three if residents continued to be water wise.

"There's no critical measures, but the more chance of people being responsible in water usage, the more chance of staying on level three," he said.

Mayor Keith Campbell said people would become more conscious of water usage as drought conditions continued.

"As this dry weather continues, there is a great amount of interest in the level of water and controls to be observed," Cr Campbell said.

 

Dripping tap generic. Water restrictions generic. Saving water generic
Level-three water restrictions may be revised early next year if there is no significant rain in the South Burnett. Jessica McGrath

Mr Meehan said discussions to increase water restrictions would need to happen soon due to the current rate of water usage.

"If we don't receive rain soon, we'll need to start looking at it after Christmas," he said.

There is still a considerable volume of water in Boondooma Dam, which is used by high-priority users Stanwell and Tarong.

Mr Meehan said any increases in restrictions should not affect storage.

"The biggest issue for Kingaroy is the level of Gordonbrook Dam," he said.

"We currently use 30 per cent of water use for Kingaroy from that dam."

 

Gordonbrook Dam is a popular spot for day trips in the South Burnett.
Gordonbrook Dam is a popular spot for day trips in the South Burnett. Jessica McGrath

Gordonbrook Dam currently sits at 70.53 per cent capacity, Boondooma Dam at 28.67 per cent and Bjelke Petersen Dam at 5.65 per cent.

Council still has 100 per cent of water allocations from Bjelke Petersen Dam and Boondooma Dam, after allocations for medium-priority water licencees were reduced to 0 per cent.

While council still has access, no rain or adequate inflows during the next six months could lead to a reduction in its allocation.

Mr Meehan said the water scenario would change significantly as people's personal dams and water supplies dried up, in addition to lower levels at dams like Boondooma and Bjelke-Petersen.

"Our water restrictions are a lot tighter than neighbours like Toowoomba," Mr Meehan said.

Two towns in the Toowoomba region have recently been escalated to high-level water restrictions by the council.

Residents living in Yarraman and Cecil Plains moved to high level-water restrictions on August 19.

 

Gordonbrook Dam is a popular spot for day trips in the South Burnett.
Gordonbrook Dam is a popular spot for day trips in the South Burnett. Jessica McGrath

South Burnett council CEO Mark Pitt said the council had collaborated with the State Government and neighbouring councils to release a series of water wise adverts.

This move was made due to the seriousness of the drought.

The regional water crisis campaign is aimed at reducing water consumption and urges residents to restrict their water usage.

According to the South Burnett Regional Council, level-three water restrictions means sprinklers are not to be used.

Hand-held watering is allowed from 6am to 7am and 5pm to 6pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays for odd-numbered houses and Wednesday, Fridays and Sundays for even-numbered houses.

No residential watering is permitted on Mondays.

Hosing and washing of paved and concrete areas is not allowed under level-three restrictions.

How you can save water

  • Save up to 9L a minute: Turn the tap off while you clean your teeth, shave, or soap up before washing hands.
  • Save 36L of water: Cut your shower time down from seven to four minutes.
  • Save 9L a minute: When rinsing dishes or washing fruit, part-fill the kitchen sink instead of running the water.
  • Select water-efficient appliances when replacing any that use water, like washing machines.
  • Only wash clothes when you have a full load.
  • Sweep paved areas, driveways and paths with a broom.
  • Native trees and shrubs need less water.
  • Mulch garden beds to reduce water loss (which can be up to 70 per cent through evaporation).