Why being bald may soon be optional

 

BALDING could soon be optional as the nation's top dermatologists flag great recent success in medical hair loss trials.

The Australasian College of Dermatologists claim that over the past two years there have been significant advances in treating all kinds of hair loss.

Balding due to hormone changes affects half of the Australian population over 40.

Now hair transplants, platelet injections and lasers are all used to stave off male patterned baldness,

Genevieve Ash looks for something to brush on friend Cosmo Gregurek’s shaved head. Picture: AAP image/John Gass
Genevieve Ash looks for something to brush on friend Cosmo Gregurek’s shaved head. Picture: AAP image/John Gass

Dr Pooja Sharma, dermatologist and fellow of the Australasian College of Dermatologists says the treatment of hair disorders is at an exciting phase.

"Newer biological medications are proving to be successful in otherwise recalcitrant hair conditions like lichen planopilaris and alopecia areata.

"We are providing hair transplants, Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and low level LED laser for androgenetic alopecia or what is known as male pattern baldness," he said.

Dermatologists provide both surgical and medical hair treatments.

"Phase II and phase III clinical trials are currently enrolling patients with chronic severe alopecia areata.

"Report of off-label use of tofacitinib in alopecia areata that is recalcitrant to therapy are reporting success rates of up to 80 per cent," Dr Sharma said.

Dermatologist and fellow of the ACD Dr Yu-chuan Lee says "perhaps in the future balding will be optional".

Cosmo Gregurek, 26 from Ashgrove, started losing hair in his early 20s and decided to shave it off.

"I am someone who doesn't mind being bald and would stay that way even if there was successful hair growth medicine but I think it's great for those guys that get very upset by hair loss," he said.