A one-injection treatment developed in Queensland is wiping out cancerous tumours in dogs, with trials now underway for human cancers.
A one-injection treatment developed in Queensland is wiping out cancerous tumours in dogs, with trials now underway for human cancers.

Wonder drug killing dog cancers

A Queensland company has manufactured a miracle liquid injection that obliterates cancerous tumours in dogs.

QBiotics has just received FDA approval for the distribution of the veterinary treatment in the US and it is already in use in the UK and across Europe.

"We hope to have approval for the pharmaceutical Tigilanol tiglate branded as Stelfonta for canine mast cell tumours to be available to vets in mid 2021," chief executive Victoria Gordon said.

Clinical trials show that 75 per cent of dogs treated with a single injection were cured and 88 per cent of the dogs who needed two injections were cured.

Leanne Leyke with dog Nase, who was in clinical cancer trials and his cancer was cured.
Leanne Leyke with dog Nase, who was in clinical cancer trials and his cancer was cured.

 

The drug targets mast cell tumours which are the most common skin cancer in dogs and represent about 15 to 20 per cent of all tumours. A lump is often palpable.

QBiotics is now moving forward with human trials of the active ingredient tigilanol tiglate. There are currently four trials in planning or underway across human solid tumours - including melanoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. These trials are proving to be extremely promising.

"Dogs are very good models for human cancer and we are very excited. We have been developing this for many years," Ms Gordon said.

The canine injection is proving a godsend for owners of dogs suffering with cancer. The injection is well tolerated by the dogs and much less harsh than chemotherapy or surgery.

"We are very supportive of animal welfare and are dog lovers so it is very satisfying to see dogs flourish after the treatment," she said.

Leanne Leyk's dog Nase, an eight-year-old bull terrier, was part of the clinical trials at QBiotics at Yungaburra.

"Nase had a nasty mast cell tumour on his leg and was successfully treated with Stelfonta," Ms Leyk said.

Within a month he was better after the treatment than beforehand.

"He wasn't as tired and got his appetite back. I would recommend this over surgery - he'd probably have had to lose a leg if we went down that path," she said.

"He would have hated that as his whole life is chasing after a ball. I'm grateful."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally published as Wonder drug killing dog cancers