WHIP CRACKERS: The Saint Mary's whip cracking team at the Ekka.
WHIP CRACKERS: The Saint Mary's whip cracking team at the Ekka. Photo Contributed

Young whip crackers take on Sunrise hosts

THE Saint Mary's Whip cracking team taught the Sunrise crew a few things about whip cracking when they took on the journalists at the EKKA last week.

The crew abandoned their regular getup of suits and skirts and pulled on the boots, jeans and akubras to get in the spirit.

The look was all for show, though, as the television hosts were no match for the country students.

Year 10 student Olivia Frahm, who has been whip cracking since she was five-years-old, was given the task of teaching Natalie Barr how to crack a whip.

"A couple of them were pretty hopeless at it," Miss Frahm said.

"Nat did get it eventually, but at the start she had no idea."

Louisa and Olivia Frahm.
Louisa and Olivia Frahm. Photo Contributed

As the students explained their sport and showed the way, the news reporters gave it their best shot but it all ended in a lot of red welts and weak cracks.

Following the lesson, Sunrise news presenter Natalie Barr said she had great respect for the young whip crackers.

"I have a new appreciation for those whip crackers - that was so hard." she said.

Miss Frahm said it could be a difficult sport to pick up.

"I think learning new tricks is quite difficult," she said.

"You've got to spend a lot of time on it and change the technique to the way it suits you."

WHIP CRACKERS: Saint Mary's Whip Cracking team have skill but also swag.
WHIP CRACKERS: Saint Mary's Whip Cracking team have skill but also swag. Photo Contributed

The Saint Mary's whip cracking team has been in action for nearly two years and has done everything from local shows to opening the G20, the parade at South Bank as well as open the EKKA last year.

The team is run by teacher Lauren Arrell and Paul Sims, who comes to the school each week to hone the students' tricks.

"Some of the kids had never picked a whip up when we started," Ms Arrell said.

"They've come a long way, not only in skill but also in their public performance - they've gone from rather embarrassed to being able to smile and take on big audiences."