HISTORY OF SHOWS: This photograph from the 1930s shows classic motor vehicles centrally parked in the street.
HISTORY OF SHOWS: This photograph from the 1930s shows classic motor vehicles centrally parked in the street. Contributed

Your historic guide through Australian car culture

SINCE the first cars hit our Australian roads in the late 1890s, the motor industry has had some significant changes.

To showcase the progress they'd seen, one of the first Australian motor trade shows graced Victoria with motor spirit in 1912.

It was called the Victorian Motor Exhibition and was held at the Royal Exhibition Building from August 31 to September 7 of that year.

According to Museum Victoria, 54 exhibitors participated in the event, displaying imported cars and motorcycles, as well as tyres, fuels, accessories and more.

One of the hot-topic cars at the time was the 1899 Thomson steam car, which is still held at Museum Victoria.

The Australian International Motor Show (AIMS) quickly caught on to the motor trade show trend, with their first event held in 1925, also at Melbourne's Royal Exhibition Building.

According to AIMS, this show hosted 61 exhibitions for motor lovers to enjoy, and many travelled far and wide for the event.

AIMS held exhibition events between both Sydney and Melbourne from then onwards, and is known as Australia's longest running motor show, before discontinuing after 2014.

From the influence of these different car shows, as well as motorsports events across Australia, a high demand for Show and Shine events as well as motor racing started spreading through each state.

Since 2016, the South Burnett saw the area's demand for one of these events, and the Wondai Street Sprints were born.

The Wondai Street Sprints have since offered annual Show and Shine events as well as motor racing, for everyone to enjoy, all over the one action-packed weekend.

Don't forget to head down to the Wondai Industrial Estate on April 13 and 14 to see what this year has to offer.

Adults entry costs $15 for one day, or $25 for a weekend pass, while children under 14 remain free.